Upcoming Events

May 2, 2014

Water Canyon and Socorro region
Friday, May 2 and Saturday, May 3, 2014, all day, both days
$160/non-FOA members, $150/FOA members

May 3, 2014

Prehistoric New Mexico Open House at Blackwater Draw Nat'l Landmark
Saturday, May 3, 2014, 9 am-5 pm, free

June 1, 2014

Chiles and Sherds at the Galisteo Basin, Pueblo San Cristóbal
Sunday, June 1, 2014, all day, $95

September 12, 2014

Canyons of the Ancients
Friday, September 12 through Tuesday, September 16, 2014, $370

October 18, 2014

Archaeology Day at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology
7 Old Cochiti Road
Santa Fe, NM 87507

Saturday, October 18, 2014, 10 am to 4 pm, free

From the Director

Cooking with Style (and Function)...

In nearly five decades as an archaeologist I have analyzed or supervised the analysis of more than a million potsherds. The collections have originated from sites across a broad sweep of territory, from Wyoming to northern Mexico and from California to Texas, but most have come from the sites on the Colorado Plateau, otherwise known as the greater Four Corners region. . .
[ read more ]

Yucatan, the Mayan Route, and Chiapas trip

 Click here for more information about this trip

 

From Mérida to San Cristóbal de las Casas, this exciting tour will take us to some of the most interesting sites of the Mayan world. We start with Uxmal and Kabah, two of the three archaeological remains in the Puuc Route. We continue to remote Calakmul located within the rich Calakmul Biosphere Reserve. We cross the land of the Lacandon people to marvel at the murals of Bonampak, reachable only by air until a few years ago. We navigate down one of the largest rivers in the world (7th largest), the Usumacinta, to the site of Yaxchilán. This river constitutes the border between Mexico and Guatemala. We will explore Palenque, one of the most extensively studied archaeological sites in the Americas. The discovery of the Tomb of King Pakal in 1952, with its prolific inscriptions, helped determine an early dynasty of Palenque rulers. We continue to Toniná and San Cristóbal de las Casas, the crown jewel of the Chiapas central highlands and the center of one of Mexico's most authentically indigenous regions. From here we will visit the surrounding villages of Chamula, Tenejapa and Zinacantán to observe some of the celebrations for the Day of the Dead. Finally, we will take a day to travel down the Grijalba River through the Sumidero Canyon with vertical walls as high as 1,000 meters.

Come and experience Mexico with the Friends of Archaeology. Join Tim Maxwell, OAS Director Emeritus and Rosa Ramirez Carlson, of Journeys International, Inc. in this special fundraising tour to some of Mexico’s most remote and beautiful lands. (read more)

 

About the Office of Archaeological Studies

The Office of Archaeological Studies (OAS) conducts archaeological research projects throughout New Mexico with a diverse group of 25–40 archaeologists and support staff. Our mission is to identify, interpret, and share information about prehistoric and historic sites across the state. The office serves state agencies and private organizations that need archaeological studies performed as part of their development projects. In addition, we also provide ethnographic and historical research services. We have an education outreach program that directly interacts with New Mexicans in order to answer their questions about archaeology, history, and the heritage of New Mexico. Under Chuck Hannaford's leadership, that program has twice received the Society for American Archaeology's Excellence in Public Education Award, in 2005 and again in 2012.

Roomblocks at the McCarty's highway salvage excavation

In addition to client-initiated projects, the Office of Archaeological Studies conducts research projects that are funded by grants and private donations. Many of the projects make use of a dedicated corps of volunteers. The office provides training opportunities for university students and makes use of their skills in the latest technology. We also collaborate on archaeological projects with Mexico's national archaeological program and have held educational outreach programs in surrounding states.

The office has five specialized laboratories, a small library, and a publications department. We have nationally recognized specialists in pottery, botany, and osteology, and our archaeomagnetic dating laboratory is one of two full-time laboratories in the United States that are dedicated to this dating technique.